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Uppity Wisconsin - Progressive Webmasters

« Edgewater Vote Troubling for Democracy | Main | City Review of Snow Plowing May Be Informative »

December 18, 2009

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Ty O'Mara

I used your post as an opportunity to google Earlham College, which, of course, I had never heard of before. A beautiful mini-history lesson on the Quakers moving from slave states to Indiana. The history of that small college also reminds one of all the diversity and pockets of culture available in this country. I hope we can stay un-homogonized as a nation. Nice tribute to your old neighbor. With his religious background-makes me wonder if he was ever an acquaintance of Frank Lloyd Wright.

Nicole

As a graduate student at UW-Madison Geography Dept, I never took a soil course with Dr. Hole, but I did manage to take a workshop with him at the Friend General Conference in Stillwater, OK. Francis Hole had such joy and respect for the earth and soil -- he loved sharing his knowledge. The passage of the Antigo Silt Loam was big news to geographers, geologists and other environmentalists. About the same time folks were lobbying for the state soil, there was a movement afoot to lobby for the state dog. At the Center for Public Representation, we were advocating for one of colleague's dog, Fang, to be state dog but the WI legislators wanted a breed of dog not an actual dog. Thanks for your posting on Francis Hole.

Curtis Turner

Dr. Francis Hole was an inspiration and as one of his undergraduate students in 1962, he handed out in class one day the first bound copy of the 7th Approximation of Soil Classification which had recently been published after many iterations and a major pedology meeting in Madison. I believe that he had a major hand in developing that document. In any case, I also saw him many times demonstrating with students in the "peace movement" on campus and attended his Quaker Meeting House one time to share in the "Quaker experience." Our colleges would be richer if we had more of his type as professors and teachers.

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