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Uppity Wisconsin - Progressive Webmasters

« Growing Poverty In Madison - Part I | Main | The State of the State of Wisconsin and the United States »

January 26, 2010

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Soon-To-Be-Ex-Alderman Steve

Hey! Don't forget Middleton! Our TIF district has benefited mightily from Madison's reluctance to embrace change, a la Edgewater. Personally, I think the whole region (including Middleton) would benefit even more if Madison fully embraced its role as a catalyst for economic development. But if Madison's political class prefers to hunker down and continue it's snapping turtle strategy, well...that works for us, too.

antpoppa

Mr. Cooley must beware of the investment bubbles that have destroyed the economy. Our government must take charge of the economic engines that benefit our city, yet draw a fine line not to become a collective, which can deliver more wealth into fewer hands.
These plans have not been developed yet that will operate in this predatory economic system.
I wish him luck.
As citizens we can help our community by realizing that the neo-cons are busy selling us an ideology that presents the poor as social, economic and political dead weight. People that have lost everything are not losers, and should not become targets of the municipal governments.

Ronald M. Trachtenberg

Tim Cooley understands that to have a progressive city you need resources -- which means that you need to encourage outside investment and re-investment. If the City continues to say do it our way or no way, those investors will simply say thank you and move onto a better investment scenerio.
Capitalism and the market aer simply a forms of democracy. Investors can vote with their dollares.

Ronald M. Trachtenberg

Tim Cooley understands that to have a progressive city you need resources -- which means that you need to encourage outside investment and internal re-investment. If the City continues to say do it our way or no way, those investors will simply say thank you and move onto a better investment scenerio.
Capitalism and the market are simply a forms of democracy. Investors can vote with their dollars.

SORRY FOR THE TYPOS IN THE ORIGINAL POST

Brian (neaguy)

One way to combat poverty is to have higher paying jobs. Those come with unionization. It's certainly not going to come through education since the bulk of the new jobs that will be created in the next decade are low paying service jobs.

Unionization, or the the poverty level and lines at the food pantry will just keep increasing. That's essentially, your choice.

Ordinary Jill

I think the Epic example is a straw-man argument. Epic wanted a big tract of land for a sprawling new campus. There just isn't that much undeveloped land in the city of Madison. If I recall correctly, Madison offered incentives for Epic to build a high-rise headquarters, but the company wanted a horizontal rather than vertical configuration, for reasons of corporate theory regarding how employees in different departments relate to each other in a horizontal versus vertical arrangement.

The example of Marcus Theatres building the replacement for Eastgate in Sun Prairie is a much better example of how the City of Madison provides counter-productive barriers to business.

Regarding Brian's comment (unionization versus education), Madison's high schools should be doing more to steer students into the skilled trades. Most guidance counselors are only encouraged to steer students toward four-year colleges. It's a common joke that, in Madison, PhD stands for Pizza Hut Delivers.

Marc Eisen

Epic's first choice was to expand on its Odana school site and include the Westgate Mall property in the new headquarters. The suburban campus model came only after that plan collapsed in the face of the city's monumentally shortsighted concerns about protecting a neighborhood park. It's no exaggeration to say that Epic's subsequent decision to build a world-class headquarters in rural Verona will change the face of Dane County development in the 21st century. It’s painful to consider how Madison soooooo damaged itself.

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